Workshop craft and 3d at Hogeland College, May 2021

In May 2021 we gave a workshop at Hogeland College in Warffum. The students were introduced to design, local materials, crafts, new techniques and the local value chain model from House of Design. It was nice to see how enthusiastic the students became of creating something with their hands.

Check the video:

Creative solutions
“I really like it, I’m getting all kinds of ideas.” – says one of the students, after we asked them to think of a sustainable product as an alternative to single use plastic. They came up with creative solutions to recycle plastic and to shop without packaging, and they used the local value chain model. After this first lesson about the working method of House of Design and the project Local Making Place, they followed a workshop by three professional designers.

‘As long as it bends’
The first day they learned to braid. Under the guidance of designer Esme Hofman, they made a basket of willow twigs. The technique that was used is called “random weaving”. Esme gave a short presentation about her work, materials and craft. It quickly became clear that there are countless possibilities. ‘You can actually braid anything, as long as it bends.’ The students picked it up quickly and were surprised at their own results.

Digging and drilling for clay
On day two we started to work with clay. At half past nine in the morning we were – defying wind and weather – digging and drilling behind the dike at Noordpolderzijl. After about half a meter, the clay appeared that we were looking for and took back to the classroom. Designer Marc Paulusma then explained to them how to process the clay before you can use it. With Tinkercad, the students made their own 3D design and Marc had brought a 3D clay printer, which he used to print a cup. “I am pleasantly surprised at the designs they have made” – says Marc.

Thumb jar
Clay specialist and craftsman Wybren Veenstra took over the lesson in the afternoon and briefly told about the history of clay in Groningen and showd products that are and were made of clay. Then the students made different shapes, including a thumb jar, in order to get to know the material and the different techniques. Wybren gave tips: how they can handle the material the best way and how they can decorate the shapes.

Excited about creating
Looking back at the lessons, the students were especially enthusiastic about making something. They think it is special that they have made something with their own hands that comes from their own neighborhood: ‘It is special that you can make something like this out of a tree!’ During the making, you saw a nice concentration and focus in the students. We also see that the students have a talent for a specific material or technique. For some students the braiding goes very well and others are better with clay.

Meaning
The involved teacher and director of the school are very enthusiastic and mention the added value of these lessons for the students. In addition to your head you also need to learn with your hands and it also adds meaning for the students.

Due to corona we had to adjust the program slightly, but we are very happy with the final result. We will soon discuss how we can take this further. Together we design the future!

Here are some pictures of the lessons:

Making the local value chain

Esmé Hofman showing different products


Students braiding and wickering


Digging for clay


March Paulusma explaining 3D printing with clay

Multiplier event Simmerskoalle Flaaks – Summerschool Flax, 14th of July 2021.

During the summer holidays we organized the first ‘Simmerskoalle Flaaks’ in Bollingwier. We did this together with the European project Craft your Future to raise awareness of flax as a raw material for a circular and plastic-free future.

The Simmerskoalle got the participating students, entrepreneurs, policy makers and local residents to think about the transition to plastic-free. With lectures by Eileen Blackmore and Thomas Eyck, among others, but also through workshops.

We could not have wished for a better ambassador than Alderman Jelle Boerema of the municipality of Noardeast Fryslân, who took care of the opening of the day. According to him, flax can make a nice contribution to a broad prosperity along the Wadden Sea coast. In his opening words, Boerema discussed the value of flax for biodiversity and the contribution that the crop can make to the circular economy, partly due to its high insulation value. He also believes that the government has a role to play in this. This can stimulate development through sustainable tendering. In addition, Boerema pointed out the importance of flax for recreation and tourism. More and more people are finding their way to the Wadden Sea coast, he said. This trend dates back to before corona. “People appreciate our tourism products. A flax route and a flax museum fit in nicely.”

During the day we used the Craft your Future game to invite all different stakeholders to co-operate in small groups and develop ideas how we can use craft, flax, recycled linen into future projects and products.
It worked really great! The alderman Jelle Boerema proposed to use the game to develop ideas with the municipality employees too!

Photos Janna Bathoorn

Different stakeholders playing the CyF game
Workshop weaving duck baskets from flax

Combining old crafts with new technology: 3D printed Middelsee pottery.

Eva Dijkstra is a student of Creative Craftsmanship at ROC Friesland College. Right now her work is presented at the exhibition at the Princessehof Ceramics Museum in Leeuwarden. But unfortunately, few people have seen her creations since the museums got closed due to the corona measures.

The stories behind her crated objects are worth telling and add a lot of value to the ceramics themselves.
Eva started to plan out this project when she was offered an internship at Lies Keramiek in Leeuwarden. The student had to dig the clay by herself to make it as authentic as possible, as well as to purify it and make sure it is the right clay to burn in the kiln. The process took some time, but eventually all the problems were solved.

However, after that Eva didn’t want to make your average turntable pottery. She came up with something completely different: she combined traditional with modern by making ceramic objects with a 3D printer. The process is art in itself – the clay needs to be put into the printer and it builds up a vase or jar layer by layer. She admits: “But sometimes nothing happened at all for weeks. The device had its own will.”

There are big hopes that people can see Eva’s creations again on the 9th of June but for now, thanks to these unusual circumstances, her pottery is the first long-term student exhibition in the museum.

Craft Your Future Makeathon aftermovie!

Instead of postponing or canceling the training week in Valencia, the Craft Your Future consortium prepared a Makeathon, where each of the countries was working on the same challenge, with the connection points online.

Within the two days of the Makeathon, students from 3 different countries (with about 10 different nationalities) and from 7 different schools worked on the societal challenge of heat stress. Heat stress is the result of stone-paved and walled cities with hardly any green to cool it during the hot days. Heat stress is becoming more serious now summers are getting hotter due to climate change.

Each group of students used the CyF cards to define the working components for their solution. There are four cards to choose from – craft, technology & trends, circular, and a wild card.

By the end of the second day, the students have finalized their prototypes (some teams even made more than one!), and were ready to present it to the rest of the group. It is great to see what amazing ideas young minds can create in such short time!

“Journey into the past” – Methodical game

Tryavna Art School – Bulgaria.

From 22nd to 25th February, a group of art students from “Tryavna Art School” came together to work on a methodical game. Their task was first to craft several wooden cubes with images, then to develop different game strategies with the cubes.

In Bulgaria, the students of art schools have to take two final exams at the end of their last academic year. One of the exams is in Bulgarian language and literature while the other one is in History of art. This second exam provoked the teachers in the Art School of Tryavna to think about different ways to help students properly prepare for the examination.

“Journey into the past” is a methodical game, which was developed by both teachers and students in the History of Art classes to support the students’ learning process by using art images, which are included in the final exam syllabus. The workshop turned to be very successful since both the students and the teachers found the game really helpful and fun to use in class.

“We have been thinking of various ways of developing the methodology of this game. We have been talking about designing a board game with the images; of creating online games and also of a more compact option. We present to you our first step and craft process.”, shared one of the teachers in the Art School of Tryavna.

Crafting the cubes game.

International Trainning Week at the UPV and Prototyping in Oceanonaranja FabLab

On the occasion of the 1st Craft your Future Training Week, Oceanonaranja FabLab welcomes students from the Polytechnic University of Valencia to develop the selected projects and carry out the prototypes of each one of them.

CyF: Corona Challenge Aftermovie is here! 🎉

To remember the best moments from the event, we have created this aftermovie:

Corona Challenge was a unique experience both for us and for students – there are not a lot of projects, where HBO, MBO and international students are working together. This was the first step to change that! We hope that you enjoyed participating in the event, and are looking forward to the next (hopefully, not Corona related 😉) event like this.

3D printer technology, through the eyes of Craft students.

Name: Viktor Markov

01* What is your age?
18
02* What do you study?   
Interior design
03* Country or origin. 
BULGARIA
04* Your current level of education. 
High School
05* Have you heard of 3D printing technology before?
YES
06* Have you used 3D printing technology before? 
YES
07* What do you imagine using 3D printer for?
Household tools (screwdriver, missing parts of
furniture, cutlery);
Home decoration, art;
Prototyping;
For fun;
Work (research.
08* If you had the opportunity,
you would buy a 3D printer in..?
1 - 2 years
09* Did you find 3D printer technology
helpful during school projects?
YES
10* What were the challenges for you,
using 3D printing technology?
I don’t think there were any specific challenges 
for me, we got the best teachers in that area.
11* Do you think that technology helped
or will help you in the future?
It helps build up or create an object or a piece 
that is needed much faster.
12* What did you learn during the process
of using 3D printing technology?
Programming
13* What softwares did you use for 3D printing?
Sketch up, Blender, OnShape, Vectary
14* What are the benefits of 3D printing?
Easier design and manufacturing of materials
 needed for work.
15* What are the limitations of 3D printing?
A lot curvier forms can’t be printed right.
16* How can 3D printing help improve the ways
of teaching and learning?
Even the teachers need something new nowadays.
A 3D printing class will help the students
take some weight off and relax while creating 
something entirely new.
17* Can you share some examples of great uses
of 3D printing to grow teaching and learning?
I don’t think I can.
18* How will 3D printing affect traditional crafts?
3D printing might replace most traditional crafts 
in the future, but not so soon.
19* How do you thing 3D technology can help
keeping the national heritage of a certain region?
I don’t know how, that is a relevant question. 
I don’t think that it can help that much with 
keeping the heritage of a certain region.
20* What benefit can 3D printing have to link
to or conserve craft technology?
depends. I have seen first hand the uses of 
3D printing in interior design for example.
21* How can you combine 3D printing and craft
technology in one object and what would that be?
I would use it for a house design. The interior 
design will be the 3D printing part, and the 
numerations and the rest will be on hand.
Name: DIMITAR NACHEV

01* What is your age?
19
02* What do you study?   
GRAPHIC DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS
03* Country or origin. 
BULGARIA
04* Your current level of education. 
 Bachelor degree
05* Have you heard of 3D printing technology before?
YES
06* Have you used 3D printing technology before? 
NO
07* What do you imagine using 3D printer for?
Everyday items (cups, phone covers, toys, 
exercising machines);
Prototyping;
Work (research).
08* If you had the opportunity,
 you would buy a 3D printer in..?
3 - 5 years
09* Did you find 3D printer technology 
helpful during school projects?
YES
10* What were the challenges for you, 
using 3D printing technology?
LEVELING OF THE PRINTING PLANE.
11* Do you think that technology helped
or will help you in the future?
BETTER VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF THOUGHT.
12* What did you learn during the process 
of using 3D printing technology?
PROJECTS CAN BE PRESENTED VERY LITERALLY.
13* What softwares did you use for 3D printing?
CURA ULTIMAKER.
14* What are the benefits of 3D printing?
YOU GET A REAL REPRESENTATION OF SCALE.
15* What are the limitations of 3D printing?
PRINTER SIZE.
16* How can 3D printing help improve the ways 
of teaching and learning?
WITH MANY THINGS.
17* Can you share some examples of great uses 
of 3D printing to grow teaching and learning?
I USED A 3D PRINTER TO PRESENT MODELS OF FURNITURE.
18* How will 3D printing affect traditional crafts?
TOWARDS PROGRESS AND INNOVATION.
19* How do you thing 3D technology can help
keeping the national heritage of a certain region? 
WITH MODERN PRESENTATION.
20* What benefit can 3D printing have to link
to or conserve craft technology?
you can create a common product combination 
between new and old.
21* How can you combine 3D printing and craft
technology in one object and what would that be?
you can make a combination of new and old and 
have more productivity of a product.
*3D printed design projects in scale of furniture and the realized wood table. (Part of graduation project by Dimitar Nashev, student in Interior design speciality). *
Name: Nikola Mihov

01* What is your age?
18
02* What do you study?   
Iconography
03* Country or origin. 
BULGARIA
04* Your current level of education. 
High School
05* Have you heard of 3D printing technology before?
YES
06* Have you used 3D printing technology before? 
YES
07* What do you imagine using 3D printer for?
Home decoration, art.
08* If you had the opportunity,
you would buy a 3D printer in..?
I don't know.
09* Did you find 3D printer technology
helpful during school projects?
YES
10* What were the challenges for you,
using 3D printing technology?
Learning the programs.
11* Do you think that technology helped
or will help you in the future?
Easier visualization  of the art project
12* What did you learn during the process
of using 3D printing technology?
Working with ZBrush program.
13* What softwares did you use for 3D printing?
ZBrush.
14* What are the benefits of 3D printing?
Entering the digital art field.
15* What are the limitations of 3D printing?
A lot curvier forms can’t be printed right.
16* How can 3D printing help improve the ways
of teaching and learning?
You work with a computer, not with your hands.
17* Can you share some examples of great uses
of 3D printing to grow teaching and learning?
By helping teachers and students work out
their art projects.
18* How will 3D printing affect traditional crafts?
By introducing modern technology.
19* How do you thing 3D technology can help
keeping the national heritage of a certain region?
By making 3D models of this national heritage maybе.
20* What benefit can 3D printing have to link
to or conserve craft technology?
3D printing can help speed up the project process.
21* How can you combine 3D printing and craft
technology in one object and what would that be?
3d printing can make the process of developing 
projects for wood-carved iconostases and carved 
frames for icons much easier.
Name: Elena Vacheva

01* What is your age?
19
02* What do you study?   
Graphic design and visual communications
03* Country or origin. 
BULGARIA
04* Your current level of education. 
 Bachelor degree
05* Have you heard of 3D printing technology before?
YES
06* Have you used 3D printing technology before?
NO
07* What do you imagine using 3D printer for?
Everyday items (cups, phone covers, 
toys, exercising machines);
Household tools (screwdriver, missing
 parts of furniture, cutlery);
Home decoration, art.
08* If you had the opportunity, 
you would buy a 3D printer in..?
3 - 5 years
09* Did you find 3D printer technology
helpful during school projects?
YES
10* What were the challenges for you,
using 3D printing technology?
I don’t have any challenges
11* Do you think that technology helped or 
will help you in the future?
The technology  help me to imagine the 
real proportion of the objects I design
12* What did you learn during the process
of using 3D printing technology?
I learn to use many programs.
13* What softwares did you use for 3D printing?
3ds max, Cura, 
14* What are the benefits of 3D printing?
All your projects can become a reality.
15* What are the limitations of 3D printing?
Тhe material he works with.
16* How can 3D printing help improve the ways 
of teaching and learning?
The technology  help students  to imagine
 the real proportion of the objects they design.
17* Can you share some examples of great uses
of 3D printing to grow teaching and learning?
Мaking models.
18* How will 3D printing affect traditional crafts?
I think it will help to save them.
19* How do you thing 3D technology can help 
keeping the national heritage of a certain region?
Perhaps with the production of souvenirs.
20* What benefit can 3D printing have to link
to or conserve craft technology?
Making traditional sites for the region.
21* How can you combine 3D printing and craft
technology in one object and what would that be?
Souvenirs such as magnets and keychains.
* 3D printed design projects in scale of furniture and interior. (Part of graduating project by Elena Vacheva, student in Interior design speciality). *